This design may look like an all over mosaic pattern but it's more like a motif with the way it sits within the panel.

 
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This design does have you breaking one of the key mosaic knitting rules - at a couple of points you slip 5sts, not 3sts... which for mosaic purists will be very troublesome but I promise there's a good reason for it! And there are ways to manage those long floats, and we’re working on a tutorial for that.

 
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The all over geometric pattern and the way it works towards the centre at the crown reminded me of urban planning and city sprawls. Like a maze of streets and blocks.

 
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We took these photos in the room next to where we shot High Rise and there was one streak of light was just enough provided I stood at the end of it and bounced it back towards Anju! This whole collection has been an experiment in playing with light and we've rather enjoyed it :)

 
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This collection is due the first week of September. The first folks to hear about it will be members of The Woolly Hat Society and Patreon supporters. Yarn info has been given in another post, follow the categories at the bottom of this post to find it :)

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AuthorWoolly Wormhead

This design is a little different from the rest as it doesnt feature an all over mosaic pattern but instead features a mosaic motif that is repeated around the Hat within the panels.

 
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Folks may be wondering how it is that it's done, as within mosaic you can't (shouldn't!) slip more than 3sts at a time and well... with this pattern you don't.

The motif is supported in the panel by short rows.

 
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And I gotta say, I was rather chuffed with the engineering of this one :)

Because it is heavily engineered, it needed to be.

 
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There are few external areas to the derelict quarries but we felt this area apt for Hat, given the columns supporting the machinery structures and a plant's want to stretch up to the sunlight. It makes the lighting on Anju different but I like it.

 
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And the name? Think of the way trees grow up towards the sunlight... it is a literal uprising. You may also notice that the names have other meanings, too.

Every name used reflects things that come together. Things that converge at the centre. But they also reflect the troubling times we live in… this wasn’t necessarily a conscious choice, but I am aware of it and am totally OK with it, too. Because not all of the words have negative meaning. Many, if not most, have optimism hidden in there. Actions and hope. Some give pause for thought. And some we are already familiar with.

 
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This collection is due the first week of September. The first folks to hear about it will be members of The Woolly Hat Society and Patreon supporters. Yarn info has been given in another post, follow the categories at the bottom of this post to find it :)

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This design appears less mosaic as the others in the Convergence collection, but it absolutely uses mosaic knitting techniques. The stripes in the panel work towards a crown shaping that reflects skyscrapers, hence the name.

 
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In every collection there's always one Hat that's harder to shoot than the others - in Elemental it was Opal. And for this collection, 'Convergence', it was this one. The shots are lovely and perhaps not quite as clear of the Hat pattern as others, but it's ok as this pattern doesn't have as much detail as others.

I've just remembered this was shot in the same room as Opal... maybe the room is jinxed?

 
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Because this pattern isn't all over mosaic slipped stitches, it's also the slouchiest of the collection. There is room in the pattern to add or remove repeats of the stitch pattern to adjust the depth, and of course the number of required panels can also be adjusted, just like the others.

Talking of which, the panels are designed to be 2in/5cm wide at the brim if gauge is met so it makes it easier to adjust. 8 panels however gives the smoothest crown for each, so you do also have the option of adjusting gauge if you'd like to keep the number of panels the same.

 
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The adjustment points for each Hat are marked in a similar way to the Inversion Hats… some have a smaller pattern repeat, like this one, that allows finer adjustments in the depth. Others, like Construct, have little wiggle room and would be best adjusted via gauge. There are though at least options for changing sizes which is pretty important.

 
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This collection is due the first week of September. The first folks to hear about it will be members of The Woolly Hat Society and Patreon supporters. Yarn info has been given in another post, follow the categories at the bottom of this post to find it :)

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AuthorWoolly Wormhead

This is the 2nd design from the new Convergence collection which will be published in the first week of September.

 
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This is a bit of an unusual name for a Hat. It was originally going to be called ‘Build’ after the Housemartins song but I felt the meaning was a little lacking in dimension (truth be told all of the designs were going to be named after songs but I ran out of ideas and instead approached the Convergence theme head-on).

If you want to know whether it’s CONstruct or conSTRUCT to me it’s the former… but that’s the beauty of this name, it could be either and still be apt.

 
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This pattern features a twisting rope like mosaic pattern that’s been adapted to perfectly fit within this space. A majority of mosaic stitch patterns lend themselves to allover patterning but that’s not necessarily something you want with a sideways knit, as that makes for a complex graft and I don’t want to make the patterns to be intimidating. So I played around and experimented to see what I could do within the space that one panel provided. What I came up with also needed to play nice the mosaic knitting ‘rules’ (one pattern breaks them, you’ll be glad to hear) but also with short rows.

 
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Each of the patterns within this collection works on the same gauge AND has the same number of rows in each panel at the brim. They do however had different short rows in the body and different Hat shapes, as the tension of each mosaic pattern is different. They’re not all fully balanced although I did lean towards it but with the other constraints, fully balanced mosaic patterns were nigh on impossible to achieve.

 
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What I really love about this design is the way the pattern feeds into the crown - it’s completely in step with the shaping. These little details are things I always look for and they make me so very happy!

We’re currently working away on the eBook layout and technical editing. The collection is due for publication in the first week of September and as always, the first folks to hear about it will be members of The Woolly Hat Society and Patreon supporters.

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AuthorWoolly Wormhead

I may not have been blogging much but I have been designing and knitting. And this little lot will be ready for September!

 
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This is a collection of sideways knit Hats using mosaic colourwork techniques. That means that the mosaic methods - slipped stitches - are worked in conjunction with short rows. I really enjoyed working on them and the results are pretty interesting.

 
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Short rows + mosaic knitting.

Some designs don't look like mosaic knitting; some break the rules of mosaic knitting and some look like they break the rules but don't at all.

This collection has been kindly sponsored by Dragonflyfibers and each Hat uses their Traveller DK. Over the coming weeks I’ll introduce each of the 6 designs and explain a little more about them and their construction.

The name of the collection? ‘Convergence’. It’s been a challenging collection in many ways but not at all in any way to do with the designs themselves. Lots of different things have needed to come together to make this work, and most of those things are behind the scenes kinda stuff. Coupled with the architectural nature of the designs and the strong lines that come together at the crowns, there isn’t a more a suitable name.

 
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